Sorcery, the art of becoming more…


Witchcraft is the art of making changes in one’s life according to one’s will, Crowley said. It is also the art of immersing oneself in the flows and tides of the Soul of the World, which can be designated as the Great Goddess or Lilith.. Sorcery is also the art of ecstasy, of the epic exaltation of the being and the expansion of consciousness. But Sorcery is the art of becoming more than what one was the day before, more powerful, stronger, more individual, more individuated and above all freer. Witchcraft is to chase away the gloom of everyday life, not to put marshmallows in it, but to bring out enchantment and a perception of reality transcending the dull world. Power, freedom and creativity are the natural twilight children born of the marriage between the human soul and Sorcery. They are all that stand against the black iron prison imposed by YHWH, the evil spirit of the Sons of Abraham and all dictatorships.


Pete Carroll, the founder of Chaos Magic said, not without humour, that magic works in practice and not in theory[1]. And it’s totally true! The Sorcerer acts and sees the operativity of his practice. What need then to know how and why it works? If I put the ignition key in my car in the morning and see that it starts, do I need to know all the secrets of mechanics to enjoy it? Certainly not.


Nevertheless, it is completely legitimate for some to ask the why and the how. To those, we can put forward the following explanation:


Everything is interconnected. Everything is energy and everything is interconnected, underpinned by Lilith, the Soul of the World that we could call « Great Goddess » and from which all souls are born. It is this interconnectedness which, incidentally, explains the power of the correspondences and analogies essential to magical perception. For example, the colour red and most of the natural elements red are connected to the planet Mars (or to the god Tyr) and therefore to certain magical signs, runes or symbols, the whole forming a sort of martian energy network… A network which itself is part of an infinitely larger energy network formed by the other planets (and the gods know what else), which are nothing more than relays/accumulators of energies coming from the bottom of the Cosmos.


Régis Boyer had it well understood when he said: At the most intimate part of this vision is a purely idealistic conception of matter, literally animated by what the Polynesians call mana, the American Indians orenda and the Scandinavians the hugr[2].


The magical ritual, by its suggestive power and the strength of symbolic correspondences, places the Sorcerer in a modified state of consciousness and in resonance with the Soul of the World. He is then able to use this energy (hugr) to accomplish his will. In doing so, by forcing Nature to obey him or by attracting probabilities to his advantage, the Wizard works to remove the limits and obstacles of the finite world.


Because the human will put in harmony with the cosmic forces is irresistible. Provided that the harmonization has been accomplished by means of a symbolic rite that speaks to us personally. Hence the importance of building one’s own rites and one’s own coherent system based on one’s own paradigm adapted from an existing or totally invented one.


Since consciousness draws from the very Source of universal energy, the hugr is channeled by the will, which can then direct it, express itself and influence reality. For as everything is interconnected, the magical consciousness that draws its energy from a part of the Soul of the World is then able to influence the whole. As when one pulls on a thread of a spider’s web, one makes the whole thing vibrate.


As Jacob Boehme said, quoted by Boyer: Magic is in itself only a will, and this will is the great mystery of all wonders and secrets: it is operated by the appetite of the desire of the being[3].


[1] Interview of Pete Carroll by Gordon White : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6e08lNH3O_o

[2] Régis Boyer, Le Monde du Double, 1986, Berg International, pp 15 -16

[3] Boyer, ibidem, p 19